Saturday, July 08, 2017

The Autumn Leaves-The Twilight Hours of the Autumn Leaves

Almost five years after their sparkling debut “Treats and Treasures,” it was great to hear (through the Radio Rumpus Room archives) that the Minneapolis band had not fallen to the forest floor. During those five (deceivingly dormant) years the band has branched off into new and natural sonic directions--while still thankfully rooted in the ‘60s sounds and aesthetics. This album opens up with the ominous and departing “Night of the UFO” which evokes the feeling of being in an iced-over airplane cutting through the blackness over the tundra and frozen lakes of Minnesota.  By the second song, the flickering cabin lights and flangers are squelched and direction is found landing the plane in the ba, la, la sunny West Coast dawn.  Jeaneen Gauthier’s yin backing harmonies arrive and swirl with the yang lead vocals of David Beckey—instantly making this one warm and inviting record.

Gauthier’s bobbing harmonies echo somewhere between the daybreak rays of Wendy & Bonnie and the dusky ones of  Stereolab.  “Maria’s Hat” is told with Davies detachment strung and stung at moments by Electric Prunes guitars and effects.  An autoharp opens up the gate to “Morning” with Beckey playing Lee Hazlewood while guest vocalist Lori Wray wears the boots of Nancy Sinatra and comes off sounding like Sandy Denny. Before the autoharp closes off the song, a slanting bridge connects the number to an exquisite baroque guitar solo.  A Hammond organ makes “Seaside Symphony” bounce and bump like the silver ball off the rubber bumpers of a pinball machine while the abundant harmonies suspend the song like an air hockey puck. Next, a cascading and circular guitar riff introduces “The Light Brigade of Fireflies” like it’s from the same distant shores as the Del-Fi rarity “Things Will Work Out Fine” by Beauregard Ajax.

Lastly, the elusive perfect day (that Lou Reed has even experienced) begins to fade into evening as “Stars in the Snow” begin to appear. Musically, “Stars in the Snow” holds onto some Notorious Byrd Brothers railings before reaching a starburst overlook of harmonies and the conclusion that life can be grand sometimes.  What can be played in the background as a short album echoing moments of the Paisley underground, the Church, R.E.M., Legendary Jim Ruiz Group, Brasil ’66, Stereolab, the Feelies, Yo La Tengo, High Llamas and Beachwood Sparks takes on a different glow when played front and center.  In the clearing, this is one sophisticated song-cycle naturally extending to where they have not gone before—all while still proudly displaying its sixties-tinged vibrant hues!


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